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13l)e College (Breetings 

The College Greetings is published monthly by the stu- 
dents of Illinois Woman's College. 

Contributions to its pages are solicited from the students 
of all departments, and from the alumnae. They are due the 
fifteenth of each month. 

Subscriptions, $1.00 a year, payable in advance. Single 
copies 15c. 

Entered at Jacksonville Postoffice as second class matter. 



CONTENTS 

The Madonna In Art 3 

Christmas Poems 4 

Where Santa Claus Came From 5 

An English Custom 7 

The Open Air School 9 

Gleanings from the Wider Field 11 

Editorial 13 

Nicholas Vachel Lindsay 14 

What Other Colleges are Doing 15 

From An Art Students' Diary 16 

Calendar 17 

Y. W. C. A. 19 

Senior — Junior 20 

Dramatic Club — Theta Sigma 21 

Phi Nu— Lambda Alpha Mu 22 

Belles Lettres 23 

The College of Music 24 

Alumnae 26 

Jokes 27 

Locals 28 



Ct)e College Greetings 



Vol. XIX. Jacksonville, 111., January, 1916. No. 4. 



Faculty Adviser — Miss Jennie Anderson. 

Editor-in-chief — Ruth Want. 

Associate and Alumnae Editor — Alma Harmel. 

Assistant Editors — Norma Perbix, Margaret Slatten. 

Art Editor — Ruth Patton. 

Business Manager — Ruth Taylor. 

Assistant Business Managers — Phyllis Wilkinson, Ila Allen. 



THE MADONNA IN ART 



In early art, certain religious subjects, such as the 
Annunciation, the Birth of Christ, and particular 
events in the life of Christ, were used by all painters. 
The Madonna, particularly, became a favorite subject 
and for each artist there were many phases, in which 
he could treat it. Because of the treatment of the Di- 
vine as well as the Human, there was opportunity for 
each artist to develop his own character in this work. 
It was a test for the artist since it was his opportunity 
to achieve his greatest work. His Madonnas had to be 
compared not only with those of his contemporaries 
but also with those of past generations and generations 
to come. 

There are several types and several classifications 
of the Madonnas such as the Madonna Doloroso, the 

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Madonna Reine, and the Madonna Nowrrice but, what- 
ever the type or whatever the classification, the artist's 
own conception and own individuality are to be found 
in them. From the serene other worldliness of Fra An- 
gelico's Madonnas to the more human and more mother- 
ly Madonnas of Raphael we see the development of 
treatment as time progressed. 

Not only for the church was the Madonna painted. 
Often a prominent family had its own particular ma- 
donna for protection against such things as fire or ill- 
ness. 

It is the Loving Mother which is the modern pre- 
sentment of this subject, for it is the human side that 
appeals to the modern artist. We see the love for her 
child in the mother's eyes, and still there is present the 
realization of his Divinity. 

CHRISTMAS POEMS 

A handclasp, and a golden smile, 
A desire that all may be well ; 
A little gift, and a wish fulfilled 
And a feeling of joy that naught can excel. 
A child's laugh, and a glad church bell, 
And an echo that gives evermore 
A desire to help, and a longing to trust 
Those whom we doubted before. 
A love divine, and an open heart, 
A sense of peace and goodwill that brings 
A feeling of common brotherhood, 
And a spirit that whispers of happier things — 
Christmas. 

Maud Strubinger, '18. 

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Once again we hear the scurry of the feet, 
And the laughter as the girls each other greet 

With "Are you going soon ?" 

"HI be home tomorrow noon !" 
And a departing cab goes clattering down the street. 

As vacation calls us to our homes so dear, 

We are filled with love of school and Christmas cheer ; 

As re-echoing thru the hall 

Young voices gay in farewell call, 
"A Merry Christmas and a Glad New Year." 

Charlotte Hungate, '19. 



WHERE SANTA CLAUS CAME FROM 



Little Nicholas was the only child in the home of 
a very rich man, who lived in Patara, on the coast of 
Lycia. He was born three hundred years after the 
first of all Christmases but he never saw a Christmas 
tree, never hung up his stocking or never even wished 
that his parents would give him Christmas presents. 
Partly because he was an only child and partly because 
he was so unselfish and lovable, he won the hearts of 
all the people in Patara. 

When Nicholas was almost grown, his father and 
mother died, leaving him a great fortune. The young 
man, however, determined to keep none of the money 
for himself but to give it all away, secretly, to those 
who needed it. 

One day he heard about a home in the city that 
was almost broken up with grief and poverty. Imme- 
diately he resolved to help the unfortunate family. 

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'Clje College (Greetings 



Taking a purse of gold, he started for the home, that 
very night, wondering how he could leave the money 
without being discovered. When he arrived he found 
a window open so he crept stealthily up to it, threw in 
the purse, and ran away in the darkness. This he did 
several nights without being discovered. Finally the 
father of the family caught him and found out who he 
was, but promised never to tell anyone else. 

This secret giving brought so much joy to the 
poor family and to Nicholas himself, that he began to 
distribute gifts all over the country. In time, however, 
all the people found out who their benefactor was, and, 
whenever they discovered gifts, mysteriously left for 
them, they would say, "Saint Nicholas has been here." 

Finally, wishing to work where not even his name 
was known, Nicholas left Patara and went North 
along the coast of Lycia to Myra, where he did not 
have a single friend or acquaintance. Now, it hap- 
pened that Bishop John of Myra had just died and all 
the bishops of Lycia were assembled to choose one to 
take his place. After much discussion they decided 
that God should make the choice. That night, as the 
greatest among them slept, he heard a voice that said : 

"Watch at the door of the cathedral. He, who 
shall come first in the morning shall be your bishop. 
His name is Nicholas." 

To be sure, his name was Nicholas and Nicholas 
of Patara became the chief shepherd of the flock of 
Lycian Myra. A better man could not have been found 
His door was always open, he was a helper of the help- 
less and a friend to all. 

It came about, therefore, that all the East rever- 
enced Saint Nicholas the Wonder Worker. When, six 

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hundred years later, the Czar of Russia went to Con- 
stantinople to be baptized, he carried back to his people 
the story of Saint Nicholas. From the Russians the 
story went to the Finns and Scandinavians, the people 
of the reindeer sleds. From these three countries, 
Saint Nicholas' fame spread into England, Germany, 
and the Western World. 

Saint Nicholas died on December the sixth and on 
that night, as the church stories say, he was born into 
glory. In Protestant countries the festival of Saint 
Nicholas has been retained, but the day has been 
changed so that now, he brings his gifts on the eve of 
our Master's birthday. Santa Claus, as children like 
to call him, is as universally beloved as ever. Just as- 
people throughout the centuries were ready to testify 
that Saint Nicholas brought them gifts, so we can 
believe that his warm beneficence continues and that, 
by coming himself or by causing generosity in others, 
he still brings gifts on Christmas Eve to gladden the 
hearts of his beloved children. 

Rose Ranson, '16. 



AN ENGLISH CUSTOM 



The great guest room was fairly alive with frolic- 
some people. Old men and women, girls and boys, and 
even children laughed and sang and danced until the 
walls echoed with the sound of cheer. Even the old 
square piano, animated by the Christmas spirit, burst 
forth in loud peals of rhythmic music such as had not 
been heard since the last Christmas season. So wild 
and loud was the merriment, so strong was the feeling 

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of the Christmas spirit, that even the wreaths of holly 
and bunches of mistletoe swayed back and forth in 
their places over the doors and windows. At one end 
a large fireplace, almost the width of the room, gave 
out a welcoming warmth. The huge Yule log, as large 
as a small sized oak tree, cracked and roared in unison 
with the music, happy and contented that it could offer 
warmth and cheerfulness against the bleak, midwinter 
night. With every moment the excitement of the peo- 
ple rose. Hilarious from the amount of old English 
wine drunk at the feast hour, they danced more stren- 
uously and laughed louder than before. 

But there was one who took no part in the cele- 
bration. In an out-of-the-way corner, so secluded as 
not to be easily seen, but from which a good view of 
the guest room was to be had, sat a lone girl. Her pow- 
dered hair and her brilliant shepherdess costume 
showed well in the dimly lighted corner; her rather 
pretty face was covered by a scowl and she anxiously 
played with the cord of her dress. How happy she had 
been a few hours before ! When, at twilight, the men 
had brought the oak logs from the forest she had stood 
in the door with the lighted candle; she had even 
thrown the glass of wine over the master of the house 
as he crossed the threshold, for she had been chosen 
as the most beautiful of English maidens. Her lover 
had looked at her with proud glances and she had re- 
turned them with an assuring smile. But now he 
danced with another and the admiring looks were for 
the stranger whom he swung so gracefully over the 
crowded floor. 

"The dance ended. The eyes of the girl anxiously 
followed the movements of the couple in whom she was 

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so interested ; she saw him introduce the stranger to a 
group and then turn away and look carefully over the 
hall. He walked thru the crowd, but, disappointed at 
not finding the one for whom he sought, he made his 
way to the secluded corner. There he found her, but 
his pleasant greeting was met by a freezing silence. 

"Won't you come and meet my sister ?" he finally 
asked. A smile broke from the corners of the girl's 
mouth and spread over her face. As she raised her 
eyes, they both saw the sprig of mistletoe that hung 
over them and they were happy ; for kissing under the 
mistletoe was an old English custom, a custom as old 
as time itself and one which no one dared to break. 

Ruth Mendenhall, '18. 



THE OPEN-AIR SCHOOL 



Woman's College girls always have a hobby. This 
year it is expressed in the active work that the Service 
Circle is doing in the Fresh Air School for tubercular 
children at West State Street. U1S 

The idea of a Fresh- Air School for Jacksonville or- 
iginated in the summer of 1914 in the wide-awake Wo- 
man's Club of Jacksonville. Altho it was the instiga- 
tor of the movement, the school is operated and backed 
financially by the Morgan County Anti-Tuberculosis 
Society and the Jacksonville School Board. Miss Olm- 
stead receiving the appointment of nurse, came here 
from Baltimore to lead in the organization. After an 
active campaign for a building and needed supplies, the 
school was permanently opened in January, 1915. 

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Miss Olmstead inspected the children in the city- 
schools for tubercular symptoms, and twenty of the 
most urgent cases were sent to the open-air school. 
The number has been enlarged as rapidly as additional 
equipment would permit until at the present time 
thirty-nine children are receiving their right to a nor- 
mal, healthy life. The number remains small, not be- 
cause of a lack of tubercular children but because of a 
lack of funds. 

Every child who attends the school is weighed ev- 
ery week, and a record is kept of the advance in weight 
and general health. A hot dinner is served at noon, and 
during the day each child is wrapped in a blanket and 
allowed a period of rest. General principles of health 
are taught, together with the regular class-room work. 

After a child's vitality is restored and he is in a 
normal physical condition, he is sent back to the public 
school, and another needy one takes his place in the 
clinic. Seldom does a child return to school who is not 
able to keep up with his class after the cause of his 
dullness has been overcome by giving health to his 
body. 

Miss Laura Hammond, the teacher for the school, 
is especially fitted for her work by a course taken last 
summer in Columbia University in the teaching of the 
abnormal child. 

The open-air school in Jacksonville is the only one 
in the state of Illinois outside the city of Chicago and 
its suburbs. Jacksonville is proud of its initiative and 
its opportunity. While the strictest economy is neces- 
sary the school is now on a financial basis such that it 
will be able to continue its work thru the summer 
months and thus avoid the relapse in health shown by 

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the children last summer. The object of the school is 
to build up the physical condition of the children in or- 
der to give to the community normal men and women 
for its citizens. It saves the city the burden of caring 
for helpless adults later on. Surely this object is one 
which merits hearty response from the community 
benefited. 

Visitors are always welcome. Take your picture- 
show time for one Monday, girls, and see how "the 
other half lives." 

Mary Baldridge, '16. 



GLEANINGS FROM THE WIDER FIELD 



With the announcement on November 14th of the 
death of Booker T. Washington came the consciousness 
of a national loss. It has been said, that the mission 
of Booker Washington was in behalf of the entire south 
as well as his own people, that he understood the white 
man as well as the negro. Very significant was the 
presence of the thousands who thronged to the Tuske- 
gee Institute grounds to pay tribute and honor to the 
man who had done so much for the uplift of his race. 

Some time ago the State Library Commission of 
Wisconsin made a house to house canvass in a pioneer 
territory in the northern part of the state. In the hun- 
dred and fifty square miles canvassed there were twen- 
ty-one houses. Five of these were found to contain no 
books at all and in four others only the Bible was 
found. Matthew S. Dudgeon originated the parcel 
post library plan, by this means the boy of the farm 
could have access to the best literature. Four of the 

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Madison libraries were found to contain about one half 
million volumes belonging to the state. The plan was 
to send, upon request any books in the library, provided 
the transportation charges be paid. These charges it 
was figured would not exceed five cents a volume. This 
system was developed along regular library lines, a 
book could be kept for two weeks and renewed if the 
person desired it. This is one means Wisconsin has 
taken to educate her young people. 

Should Lord Kitchener call for recruits between 
the ages of forty and fifty, a million men would re- 
spond. So comes the word from across the water. The 
fact is that half this number are organized into a "Vol- 
unteer Training Corps" and the call for recruits would 
double this number. The V. T. C. is made up of men 
from every walk of life. While the organization may 
not do any actual fighting still it does a great work in 
stimulating recruiting. 

On December 4th the Ford Peace Party sailed on 
the Oscar II. Many prominent people are in the party, 
Vachel Lindsay, who has just been to Jacksonville was 
asked to become a member of the party, but could not 
accept. The party carries passports to all the neutral 
nations. The slogan adopted by Henry Ford is "Out of 
the Trenches by Christmas." What a wonderful thing 
it would be if on Christmas morning there might truly 
be Peace on Earth ! 




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Z3!)c College (Greeting* 



EDITORIAL 



"A Holiday's w'en Fathers play 
Wif little boys. 

He sees w'y don't my motor go, 
An' shows me how to catch an' fro, 
An' mends my toys." 

— Marie Louise Whitlock. 

And it is much the same spirit that is character- 
istic of Christmas time in the thot of all of us, is it 
not? The witchery of the season suggests to us, first 
of all, happy fellowship with others. The delightful 
thing about it is that we all long to put away our self- 
ishness and our differences and take time really to en- 
joy one other. Each one of us as a college girl, to 
whom Christmas means so much in anticipation, is full 
of this spirit, as we hurry homeward. Once there, in 
our relations to the other members of the family, we 
find ample opportunity to give it expression. There 
are the little brothers and sisters who are struggling 
over their own problems of gifts. What can not a few 
suggestions in making or buying, a little help in wrap- 
ping and tying, do to smooth out their difficulties and 
make them glad over their giving ! How truly festive 
are the holidays when big sister drops her years and 
her dignity to play their games with them ! With fa- 
ther and mother there seems to be fewer tangible ways 
to minister. Who of us has not felt some misgiving 
over father's Christmas, especially ? Purchasing a pre- 
sent for him out of a fund he himself has supplied 
seems a rather doubtful beneficence! But after all 
perhaps the Christmas gift that would bring the warm- 
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Tb\)t (Tollege <Bv&ttin%$ 



est glow to the hearts of our parents, is the realization 
that their daughter's chief joy centers in the family 
circle even if she has been away for a little while and 
has formed new associations. 

There is something about this fellowship spirit in 
Christmas, too, that reawakens thots of old acquaint- 
ances whom the estranging influence of time or space 
has caused to slip from our lives. With the shops full 
of seasonal cards, it is easy to obey the impulse to send 
some little reminder to show that we still remember. 
Even better would be the sending of a letter to arrive 
on Christmas morning, for letters are bits of ourselves 
that make their way straight from us into the hearts 
of the friends that receive them. 

And it is this sort of giving — self -giving — which 
always means most to the recipient, and yet is never 
restrained by the limitations of the leanest purse. 



Our capable art editor, Miss Patton, has given us 
a Christmas present. The new design on the cover 
page represents careful thot and workmanship and we 
are very happy to have it for the succeeding issues of 
The Greetings. 

NICHOLAS VACHEL LINDSAY 



To fully appreciate the poetry of Mr. Lindsay, one 
must first hear him read and interpret in his own way 
the message he has to give to the world. He is pre- 
eminently our poet of the Middle West, and an inter- 
preter of our modern life, preaching the "Gospel of 
Beauty" with sincerity and conviction. 

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X5!)e College ©reelings 



On the afternoon of December 10 he read his 
poems to an interested audience in Jacksonville, under 
the auspices of the Jacksonville Center of the Drama 
League. In the evening he gave his lecture on the art 
of Moving Pictures, outlining the part they play in our 
present system of living, and basing his hopes for the 
future on the education of public taste. 



WHAT OTHER COLLEGES ARE DOING 



We are informed by the Illinois Wesleyan Argus 
that Illinois Weslyan College celebrated Founder's Day 
on December 10th. Bishop Quayle delivered the ad- 
dress. 4 

Hedding College of Abingdon, 111., is also in the 
race for endowment. With as optimistic leaders as 
both of us have, we are sure to win. 

Augustana's Lyceum Course offers splendid at- 
tractions. The student body has indeed a reason to be 
enthusiastic over the excellent talent that is comirg 
to Rock Island. 

In the Carthage Collegian we see that in a short 
time all the requirements will have been met and Car- 
thage College will be a standard college. 

Hamline University has the gift of a swimming 
pool for their gymnasium. We, too, have this gift for 
our new gymnasium. 

Dr. Temple, Professor of International Law at 
Washington and Jefferson College, delivered two lec- 
tures, on "How Congress Works," and on "Internation- 
al Law", to the students of Monmouth College. 

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'Dtje College (Breetings 



FROM AN ART STUDENT'S DIARY 



Nov. 16. — Excitement in the studio. There's an 
excursion to Chicago. If we could only make use of it; 
for there's an exhibit by American Artists at the Art 
Institute ! Miss Knopf fled from a shower of petitions 
declaring that she must sleep over the matter. 

Nov. 18. — We're going. All plans made. Madeline 
Barnes, Mary Jefferson, Helen Ost, Sarah May, Miriam 
Pendleton, Pauline McMurphy and LaVone Patrick de- 
cided to go. Miss K. invited us to her room for coffee 
before we go to the train. 

Nov. 19. — We went to the train early to avoid the 
rush. On the way Pauline's suitcase handle broke. The 
car step was high and several had difficulty getting 
aboard. On the train — Helen slept. 

Nov. 20. — We arrive. Miss K. begins to count, 
"four, five, six, seven" in the station. After breakfast 
we spent the morning in the Art Institute. "Why 
couldn't we stay a week ?"~the unspoken thought of all. 
Lunch over, we rested five seconds, then looked at bar- 
gains in china and clothes, separated, then lost entire- 
ly. Miss K. looking wildly about is addressed by the 
floor-walker, "Lost something, Madam?" "Yes, two 
girls," and he escaped before she could enlist his ser- 
vices. After this flurry we visited several of the small- 
er galleries along Michigan Ave. 

Evening. Two theatres "sold out." We meet 
Alice Tombaugh and Elaine Buhrman. How glad we 
were to see them ! For want of something better we go 
to the movies. All are tired. Some almost fall — asleep. 

Nov. 21. — Ting-a-ling. Miriam had a telephone 
call — a man. Then Helen's father called. We spent 

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the afternoon at the Exhibit. "Girls, shall we come 
back next spring?" Chorus — "Yes ! ! !" For the beauty 
of the paintings held us under a charm that we did not 
care, nor try to resist. We did not have time to study 
the paintings intensively; we gained only an impres- 
sion of the whole, which was well worth while. 

Spent the evening at Miss K/s home and stayed 
too long, so we had to run to the train. 

Then home — and what a come-down to start work 
after such a lovely trip. All in favor of repeating the 
trip twice yearly signify by saying "Aye." "Aye! 
Aye!" "The Aye's have it." 

LaVone Patrick, '17. 



CALENDAR 



Nov. 26. — It was the wearisome day after Thanksgiv- 
ing and with it the unhappy realization that it would 
be another twelve months before another dinner like 
that. 

Nov. 27. — Phi Nu had their annual Thangsgiving ban- 
quet at Colonial Inn. 

Nov. 28. — The first real snow and how it gladdened our 
hearts. As there was general exemption from 
church, we did not have to part with one of those 
precious "cuts." 

Nov. 29. — The Household Arts class visited the school 
for the Deaf and inspected their work. Especially 
were they interested in the weaving course. 

Nov. 30. — The election for May Day Chairman was 
held, and Edith Brown was the successful candidate. 

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Obe College Greetings 



DEC. 1. — The Uliwoco Snapshot Contest closed at 9 :00 

o'clock in the evening. Miriam Anderson came out 

first. 
Dec. 2. — The first Music Recital of Pupils was held in 

Music Hall. 

The Domestic Science Club had a special program 

and social hour as it was Domestic Science Day. 
Class meetings were held in interest of student 

government. 
Dec. 3. — Dr. Harker returned from one of his numerous 

trips of these days with the same happy smile and 

word that "We'll do it." 
Dec. 4. — Y. W. Bazaar was held in the Society Halls. 

The cream cones, hamburgers and chocolates were 

the new as well as attractive features of the bazaar. 
Dec. 5. Y. W. C. A. was very interesting as the fresh- 
man girls showed their ability as leaders. They are 

deserving of mention in our paper. 
Dec. 6. — "Quality Street/' the second play of the year, 

was presented very successfully by the Dramatic 

Club in Music Hall. 
Dec. 7. — Joye Webb's Hike Club broke the record in 

hiking and was entertained by the losing clubs at a 

taffy pull. 
Dec. 8. — Miss Mothershead's annual talk on the Do's 

and Dont's of Traveling before Christmas vacation. 
Dec. 9. — Miss Lazelle, in recital, sang with her usual 

charm and artistry. 
DEC. 10.— Vachel Lindsay, the new poet, delighted the 

girls who went to hear him, by his unusual talents. 
Dec. 11. — The Junior-Senior Banquet was given at Pea- 
cock Inn. 

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Dec. 12. — It was our last Sunday in Jacksonville in 
1915. 

Dec. 13. — Warren & Moscow were quite evident in the 
halls as the trunks were brought from the store- 
room. 

Dec. 14. — Anxiety, the can't-sleep kind of excitement, 
was everywhere floating around. One thot in the 
minds of all, "Day after tomorrow we go home." 

Dec. 15. — One of the best times of the year when we 
went out on the yearly Christmas carol tours. The 
hot chocolate on our return was appreciated. 

Dec. 16. — Goodbye, to all, and especially our College. 
A Merry Christmas and a Most Happy New Year to 
you. 

Y. W. C. A. 



The Christmas bazaar was held December 4th. It 
was a success in every way and everything sold well — 
from the fancy work to the hamburgers. Special fea- 
tures were the book marks of blue leather with the 
seal and quotation. 

Following the usual custom, groups of girls sang 
Christmas hymns to the old people and shut-ins of the 
city the night before vacation. 

As a Thanksgiving present the Y. W. C. A. girls 
gave twenty dollars to the Fresh-Air School. The 
money will be used for blankets. 

The poster committee has been doing excellent 
work this year. We always look forward to the poster 
that goes up on Saturday with the announcement of 
Sunday's meeting. 

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SENIORS 

On December eleventh, at the Peacock Inn, the 
Seniors enjoyed one of the nicest times of the year. 
The occasion was a dinner party given by the Juniors 
to the class of 1916. The Seniors greatly appreciated 
the hospitality of the Juniors. 

We are glad that Ola Wendel, one of the Senior 
girls, is recovering rapidly from an attack of appendi- 
citis. 

A series of November teas given by Miss Mothers- 
head will be remembered by the girls of the Senior 
class as among the most pleasant events upon the Sen- 
ior calendar. 

JUNIOR. 

The Juniors spent a most delightful afternoon, De- 
cember the second, when Miss McLaughlin, their class 
officer, was At Home to them in Theta Sigma Hall. 
The class colors, red and white, were carried out in the 
decoration of the room and also in the refreshments 
which were served after an hour of sewing. One of the 
features of the afternoon was a contest of cartoons for 
the Annual and many valuable suggestions were given 
to the art editor. 

Saturday evening, December the eleventh, the 
class of nineteen-sixteen was entertained at dinner at 
Peacock Inn by the Class of nineteen-seventeen. The 
dining-hall was prettily decorated in the Christmas 
colors so that red and green candles and flowers were 
everywhere in evidence. After the four-course dinner, 
the Juniors represented an original play to the Seniors, 
entitled "A Christmas House-Party at Lake Matanzas." 

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DRAMATIC CLUB NOTES 



Monday evening, December sixth, the Dramatic 
Club presented J. M. Barrie's famous play, "Quality 
Street." Although a comparatively short time was 
given to its preparation all members of the cast inter- 
preted their characters with admirable skill. Great 
credit is given Miss Gleckler, as Quality Street proved 
to be another demonstration of her high ability as a 
coach. The stage settings and furnishings were beau- 
tiful and appropriate to the period of the play. 

The cast of characters is as follows : 
Miss Phoebe Throssel Corrinne Hughes 

Miss Susan Throssel Lavina Jones 

Capt. Valentine Brown Alma T. Harmel 

Patty Edna Robb 

Miss Willoughby Marceline Armstrong 

Miss Henrietta Turnbull Marie Towle 

Miss Charlotte Parrott Margaret Coultas 

Ensign Blades Mary Fowler 

Lieutenant Spires Ruth Harker 

Sargeant Helen McGhee 

Pupils of School — Frances Sconce, Francis Smith, Mar- 
garet Towle, Anna Margaret Gist, Mamie Kennedy, 
Julia Pitkin, Olive Scott. 

"Wall Flowers" — Mary McGhee, Hazel Ingram, Mar- 
garet Coultas, Romaine Loar. 
Old Soldier Ruth Patton 

$£ 
THETA SIGMA 



Theta Sigma was glad to have two of its old mem- 
bers, Louise Harries and Lucille McCloud, here for 

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'Glje College (Breetings 



Thanksgiving and the following week end. Anne Flo- 
reth entertained the Society, on Sunday, in their honor. 
Everyone had a jolly time in getting acquainted, or re- 
acquainted, as the case might be. 

On December fourteenth, after a very interesting 
Christmas program, we treated ourselves to a Christ- 
mas party. The inexpensive gifts had been selected by 
a committee and were quite appropriate for the recipi- 
ents. We wished for each other — and for all of you, 
too — a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. 

ft 

PHI NU NOTES 

On November twenty-seventh, the Annual Phi Nu 
Banquet was held at Colonial Inn. Among our old 
members back were Mrs. Anna Reavis Gist, Mrs. Shep- 
ard, Freda Si-dell, Alice Tombaugh, Irene Crum, Grace 
Reavis, Elaine Buhrman, Sydney Brown and Ruth Mat- 
tocks. After a delightful dinner Dr. Harker and Mrs. 
Gist responded to toasts. A program followed in which 
Miss Gleckler delighted us with two readings, Charlotte 
Hungate with a violin solo, Vera Teachout with a vocal 
solo, and Ruth Mattocks with a piano solo. We are al- 
ready anticipating next year's Banquet. 

Our pledges entertained us delightfully with a tea 
on Friday evening, November nineteenth. 

Miss Constance Loar of Bloomington, spent the 
week-end over December fifth with her sister Romaine. 

ft 
LAMBDA ALPHA MU. 

"Where'er we go o'er land and sea, 
Our hearts will always be with thee." 
Our meeting of December fourteenth was recog- 

Page Twenty-two 



~&\)Z College Greetings 



nized as our Annual "Old Members' Day" and it was at 
this particular meeting that we were so happy in re- 
ceiving many lovely letters and greetings from our 
former members, several of whom are now far away, 
yet very close to us in kindred spirit and loyalty to 
Lambda Mu and the College. 

We are all most happy to welcome Feme Parrot as 
a member of our society. 

We had long been held in suspense wondering just 
what was the nature of a "line party," to which our 
pledges had so kindly invited us, and our curiosities 
were gratified December sixth. We were most delight- 
fully entertained with the movies and refreshments at 
the Peacock Inn. We all enjoyed a very pleasant af- 
ternoon, and on returning were delighted and surprised 
to find in our hall, a handsome Circassian Walnut 
music cabinet as a gift to the society from our new 
pledges. We are very proud to have this beautiful gift 
which has added a great deal to the attractiveness of 
our hall. 

Mary Louise Powell has been accepted as Secre- 
tary with the American Book Concern, of Chicago. 

BELLES LETTRES NOTES 



We were very glad to have so many of the old 
girls back again Thanksgiving and for the week end. 
Alma and Bertha Weber, Hallie Clem, Dorothy Stevens, 
Freda Fenton, Sieverdena Harmel, Letta Irwin and 
Winifred Robison were the guests. 

On Tuesday, November the thirtieth, after society 
Mrs. Harker delightfully entertained the society for 

Page Twenty-three 



Z3I}£ College Greetings 



the Weber girls. The program at that meeting was 
also very interesting as it was extemporaneous and 
showed the impromptu and speedy talents of the Pled- 
ges. 

As nearly all the old girls read the Greetings we 
have not mentioned that new lights have been put in 
the hall, as we wished to surprise them. The new ar- 
rangement of the yellow globes add much to the at- 
tractiveness and coziness of the hall. 

* 
THE COLLEGE OF MUSIC 



Miss Rena M. Lazelle, of the College of Music Fac- 
ulty, was the soloist especially engaged for the Gover- 
nor's reception, on Tuesday evening, Nov. 30. Miss La- 
zelle scored with great success and was greeted with an 
innovation. Both the Governor and Mrs. Dunne, were 
outspoken in their praise of Miss Lazelle's beautiful 
voice, splendid musicianship and charming personality. 

Miss Lazelle's concert which was to have been Fri- 
day evening, December 3d, was postponed to Thursday 
evening, December 9th at the request of many ad- 
mirers of her work, who wished to attend the meeting 
of the Sorosis Club, which occurred on that date. 

The music at the first meeting of the Passavant 
Hospital Endowment campaign, on Thursday evening, 
at Grace Church, was supplied by Mrs. Florence Pier- 
ron-Hartmann, contralto, Mr. Fleet McClellan, violinist, 
and Miss Rena M. Lazelle, soprano, with Miss Dean 
Obermyer and Mr. H. V. Stearns accompanists. All of 
these are members of the College of Music Faculty. 
The musical program was a distinct feature of the 

Page Twenty-four 



I31)e College (Greetings 



evening, and there were many expressions of warmest 
admiration for the work of the artists. 

Miss Eloise Capps, a violin pupil of Mrs. R. M. Day, 
at the Woman's College, played a violin solo at the 
Special evening concert at Grace Methodist Church 
last Sunday evening. Miss Capps has a beau- 
tiful tone, broad and full and a good interpretative 
sense. Her work delighted her hearers. 

Miss Mary Violet of Beardstown, has reported for 
study of voice with Mrs. Hartman at the College 

Others from out of town who come in for work in 
the College are Miss Helen Henry of Waverly, Miss 
Alma Spicker of Beardstown, Miss Olive Fielder of Vir- 
ginia, Miss Dovie Corrington of Alexander, Miss Lois 
Main of Manchester, Miss Veda Ingram of Perry, Mr. 
Milton Angier and Leslie Liscom of Beardstown, Mr. 
Perry Kennan of Franklin, Fern Sherwood and Abigail 
Lazelle of Springfield, Miss Kathleen Stice of New Ber- 
lin. 

Thursday afternoon, December 2d. occurred the 
first of this year's series of pupils' recitals in the Col- 
lege Auditorium. The first of Mr. Stearns' series of 
monthly vesper organ recitals will occur on December 
12th. 



Do not be satisfied with wishing people a "Merry 
Christmas," help make it one. 



Without the door> let sorrow lie, 
And if, perchance, it hap to die, 
We'll bury it in a Christmas pie, 
And ever more be merry. 

Page Twenty-five 



I3I)& College (Bte&tUtgs 




umnae 



The Greetings is always glad to note any news of 
former students which has reached the College. Re- 
ports say that Fern Hartsuck, who was here in 1913-14, 
is traveling with a company of six young ladies, on a 
lyceum course. She is doing all the solo work, is first 
soprano of the Quartette and is also playing first violin 
with the leader. She is very ambitious and is planning 
to study this summer and lead a company next winter. 



The sad news of the death of the little daughter, 
Mary Jeanette, of Mr. and Mrs. Firman Thompson 
came this month. On the 31st of Oct. Jeanette was 
burned badly while playing around a bonfire, the acci- 
dent resulting in her death the next day. Mrs. Thomp- 
son was Faye Clayton when she attended I. W. C. 



On Dec. 16 all of our former students attending 
the University of Illinois and those residing in Cham- 
paign will meet at a luncheon. We expect to hear of 
a large gathering and renewed enthusiasm, loyalty, and 
interest in the present College. 



A daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. Imel of Le- 
banon, Indiana. Mrs. Imel was Ella Blake, who 
graduated in the Home Economics department, 1913. 

Page Twenty-six 



V}\)t College (Greetings 




D. H. "I expected to freeze to death last night 
and woke up this morning sadly disappointed." 

"See appendix," says the historian in a foot-note. 

"See appendix" says the surgeon, and he does. 
From a Zoology Paper 

The dog is like a human in one respect, that is, he 
can express so much by his growls. 

The following bit of interesting information is 
found in one of the notebooks : "Cane sugar is found 
most extensively in Porto Rico, the Hawaian Islands, 
the Phillistines, and in Brazil." 

I. P., from Indiana — "We see so many Illinois cars 
go past our place in the summer." 

L. J., from Iowa — "They go over there for the 
value of the roads when they want a ride, but I think 
they have to ship their cars to the Indiana line." 

L. J. — "The elevator won't go up to Five today. 
Really it seems to be temperamental." 

M. J. — The organ used to seem temperamental at 
times." 

L. J. — "Yes, but it has not shown any signs of tem- 
per lately." 

Page Twenty-seven 



T5>\)d College (Greetings 



A picturesque old Irishman walked into an artist's 
studio and asked for money. The artist seeing possi- 
bilities for sketching said : 

"Pll give you a dollar if you'll let me paint you." 

"Sure that's an easy way to earn a dollar, said the 
old fellow, "but how will I get it off?" 

"Do you always stutter?" he was asked, after 
vainly endeavoring to express himself. 

"O-o-nly wh-wh-when I t-t-t-talk." 
Bible student in examination — 

Esau was a famous hunter who lived a long time 
ago. He was also a great writer. One time he sold his 
copyright for a bottle of potash. 

1st Freshman — When do you use "their" and when 
"there"? 

2nd Freshman — Oh, when I don't have time to 
think it over I just say enie, meenie, minie, mo. 

LOCALS. 

It may be interesting for you to know that William 
J. Bryan is now sending his paper, "The Commoner", 
to us. 

Several hundred Japanese barberry bushes have 
been planted over the campus, which will add much to 
the beauty of the grounds in spring. 

Friday, December the third, was the ninety-sev- 
enth birthday of the State of Illinois. Plans are now 
being made for the Centennial Celebration in 1918. 

Doctor Harker has again left us, but he is keeping 
us in touch with him by daily telegrams. 

Miss Mothershead was called to her home in Chi- 
cago last month because of the death of her mother. 
Our dean has the heartfelt sympathy of the whole col- 
lege in her bereavement. 



Secretary Photographer's Association of Illinois. 

Awarded Silver Medal for Home Photographer at Illinois State 
Convention, 1914 

OTTO SPEITH 

PORTRAITURE BY PHOTOGRAPHY 

SOUTHWEST COR. SQUARE 



"It might be pleasant to remember Christmas Day, 
who made lame men walk, and blind men see." — Dick 
ens' Christmas Carol. 



ROBERT H. REID 

"Photographs That Please" 

Member Photographer's Association of America 
HOCKENHULL BUILDING 



ft • ■ ■ 

STYLISH APPAREL FOR YOUNG 

WOMEN 

SUITS, DRESSES, MILLINERY 
CLOAKS, WAISTS, LINGERIE 

In addition to the Newest Models in Ready-to-wear Garments 
from the Best Makers — we are showing the Correct Styles 
in CORSETS,— the Newest HOSIERY, Street and Evening 
Gloves, Dainty Neckwear, Handkerchiefs, Ribbons, Toilet 

Articles, Art Goods. 

& 

F. J. WADDELL & COMPANY 



May the New Year be a happy one to you, happy to 
many whose happiness depends on you. 

— Chimes (Dickens.) 



PHELPS & OSBORNE 

IS THE COLLEGE GIRL'S 
STORE 
SUITS, DRESSES, COATS, RIBBONS, LACES, AND NOTIONS 

POPULAR PRICES ALWAYS 

FASHIONABLE DRESS MAKING 
AND- TAILORING 

A FULL LINE OF DRESS TRIMMINGS 

MRS. EMMA CORRINGTON 

ILLINOIS PHONE 547 241 WEBSTER AVE. 



OUR PICTURES 

ARE HUING IN THE BEST HOMES IN THE CITY 
AND COUNTY 



Mollenbrok & McCullough Studio 

WEST STATE ST. 



THE 



Big City Market 

All Kinds of Fancy 
Fruit 

CANNON BROS, 

W. StateSt. Ill, Phone 1288 

WE DELIVER 



SEE 

BONANSINGA 



FOR 



Fancy Fruits 

Confectionery 

72 East Side Square 



Christmas fans the flame of happy memories, and 
sends a glow of warm Goodwill from heart to heart. 



KODAK FINISHING 

This is our SPECIALTY— You Want the BEST Results— 
Our Workmanship and Materials Give Them 

VAIL-& VAIL 



Oswald's Drug Store 



71 East Side Square 



=^\ 



Jacksonville Candy Company 

We have just installed our New Soda Fountain, and we 
can serve everything in the confectionery line v Hot or Cold 
— Also wemake all kinds of Homemade Candies and guarantee 
them under the pure food law. 

We have the very best electric Piano at our store. 
57 E. SIDE SQUARE B. J. GEANETOS, Prop. 

BOTH PHONES 566 



The Home of Good Things to Eat 

Walker's 
Grocery 

Homemade 

BREAD, CAKES, COOKIES 

SALAD DRESSING, Etc. 



205 East Morgan 



Both Phones 



W.E.Boston 

DEALER IN GROCERIES AND 
MEAT 



600 EAST COLLEGE AVENUE 
Both Phones 100 



FLORETH & COMPANY 

LEADERS IN EVERYTHING NEW IN MILLINERY 
COATS FOR LADIES, MISSES AND CHILREN 
DRESS GOODS AND SILKS 

AT LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES FOR CASH 



Ideal Bread 

is Better; 
so are the cakes 



DORWART'S CASH 
MARKET 

ALL KINDS OF FRESH AND 

SALT MEATS, FISH, POULTRY 

ETC. Both Phones 196 

230 WEST STATE STREET 



fr S\ 

VISIT 

Sch ram's 

JEWELRY STORE 

WE HAVE A FULL LINE OF COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Also Good-looking and Good-wearing Goods. 
Will Be Pleased to Show Them. 


GO TO THE 

RUSSELL & LYON 

JEWELRY STORE 

FOR THE BEST REPAIRING OF 
ALL KINDS 


E.W.BASSETT 

COLLEGE JEWELRY 
DIE STATIONERY 
ENGRAVED CARDS 
SILVER AND GLASS 
ART POTTERY 
NOVELTIES 
No. 21 SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 


"It is good to be children sometimes, and never 
better that at Christmas, when its mighty Founder was 
a child Himself." — Charles Dickens. 


BRADY BROS. 

EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 
House Furnishings and Paints 
45-47 SOUTH SIDE SQUARE 


GAY'S 

RELIABLE 

HARDWARE 




THAT OUR HOME»MADE CANDIES ARE MADE TO PLEASE 

YOU 

That you can get what you want like you want it here in the 
way of SUNDAES, SODAS, and all kinds of HOT DRINKS 

JUST PHONE 70— WE DELIVER. 

iZtulleitix $ Ufamiltoit 

216 East State Street 



LATEST STYLES IN 

FALL & WINTER MILLINERY 
Fisk Hats a Specialty 



Mrs. M. O'Neil 

206 East State Street 



H. J. & L. M. SMITH 

Millinery 
Needlecraft, Corsets 



S. Side Square 



"That man must be a misanthrope, indeed, in 
whose heart something like a jovial feeling is not 
aroused by the recurrence of Christmas." — Dickens. 



L. C. & R. E. HENRY 
DEALERS IN FINE MILLINERY 



Always Something New and 

Up-to-Date 

238 South Side Square 




Low Prices and Square Dealings 
Keep Us Busy 



FOR THOSE WHO DISCRIMINATE 

We simply suggest that it has taken our constant effort to please the 
students who come to our city. We select only the BEST materials and 
and prepare them with skillful, loving care. 

PURE CANDIES, HOT AND COLD SODA, BRICK ICE CREAM 
AND PLAIN AND DECORATED BIRTHDAY CAKES. 



Telephone 227 



ALL PACKAGES DELIVERED 

JOHN W. MERRIGAN 

227 WEST STATE STREET 



CJ.DEPPE&CO. 

Known for "Ready-toWear" and 
Popular Priced Dry Goods 



K U M - R I T E - I N 
Let Us Show You the Most Complete 
Line of Silk Hosiery, Silk Gloves, 
American Lady Corsets, Kid Gloves, 
Fancy Neckwear, Laces, Ribbons 
and Trimmings. 



DRY GOODS STORE? 



And heart will make this Christmas day, 
The happiest one, in every way, 
You've ever known, and that, you see, 
Is just what Chrristmas ought to be. 



H Safest Place to Trade £1 
ILLERBY' iJ 

DRY GOODS STORE 

PHONES 309 



LADIES 

FRANK BYRNS, 



J FURS 
SWEATERS 
HOSIERY 



HAT STORE 



^= 



a* 

JOSEPH HEINL & SONS 



Want 

Cut flowers 

FROM 



BOTH PHONES 



WEST STATE STREET 



GRAND OPERA HOUSE 

Harold J. Johnson, Mgr. 



High ClasS'Vaudeviile & Pictures 

4-Piece Orchestra Afternoon 

and Evening 

A BIG Special Feature Every Monday 

PRICES 5 and 10c 



SCOTT'S THEATRE 



ALWAYS THE 
LATEST AND 
BEST IN 
MOTION 
PICTURES 



When Christmas giving become a necessity, it 
ceases to be a virtue. 



HARRY HOFMANN FLORAL CO. 

Designs, Cut Flowers 

Plants 

SOUTHWEST COR. SQUARE 



Greenhouse South Diamond Street 

Store: Bell Phone 154—111. 182 
Greenhouse, Bell 775 



We Pipe Your House for 
GAS 

OR WIRE IT FOR 

ELECTRICITY 

AT COST 

Jacksonville Ry & Light Co. 

TWO YEARS TO PAY 224 S. MAIN 



/?= 



Cafe 



Confectionery 



peacock 3nn 



Catering 



Soda 



Candies 



PIEPENBRING'S 

VARIETY STORE 
ONE BLOCK EAST OF COLLEGE 

CANDIES, CAKES, COOKIES, 

PIES, SANDWICHES, 

POP ON ICE, GROCERIES 

CALIFORNIA FRUITS 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES 



"The Home of the Crispette" 

The Sanitary Pop-corn 
and Crispette Shop 



Pop-corn That Melts in Your 
Mouth 

Roasted and Salted Peanuts 

EAST STATE ST. 



"In robbing Christmas day of its great human 
meaning of good fellowship, we are fobbing it of its 
divine meaning of good-will." — Virginia Blair. 



Cafe 3iate 

And Annex for Ladies. 
221=223 EAST STATE STREET 

Illinois Phone 308 Bell Phone 57 




Wedding 
Reception 
Banquets 
Luncheons 
^MS^^ r-^^* M usicals 

Theater Parties 
*m Dinner Parties 
"^ Card Clubs 

Special attention to all College functions 

VICKE RY'S 

Jacksonville, 111. 



dfisSSI 



r ^ 



J. F\ BROWN 

MUSIC HOUSE 



Musical 
Merchandise 



Talking 
Machines 



Sheet Music 
19 S. Side Square, Jacksonville 




liffSfc' 



Jacksonville's Foremost Store for 

Men 
And Specialties for Women 

Knitted Silk Coats 

Sweater Coats, Student Caps 

Manish Rain Coats and Hats 

Trunks and Hand Bags 



REAL ENJOYMENT 

The kind that lasts and is pleas- 
ant to recall — 
in one of our fine rigs, or help 
her arrange a Hay Ride Party. 
Phone us for Carriages for any 
occasion 

EITHER PHONE 850 

CHERRY'S LIVERY 



The things which people really want at Christmas 
time are Joy and Jollity; they want to be caught up 
away from their cares and enter upon a season of light- 
hearted fun and frolic. — Virginia Blair. 



loover 



&Sh 



reve 



Have a Complete Line of Drugs, 
Kodaks, Perfumes 

Stationery and Holiday Gifts 

We Do Developing and Printing 

East & West Side Sq. 



We Welcome You as a Student 
after Knowledge 



Pleased to have you call on your 
down town trips 



Badger Drug Store 



235 E. State St. 



Illinois 57 



Everything for the Home 



Everything for the Home 



Andre & Andre 



Student Headquarters 
for Room Furnishings 




The Best Goods for the Price, No Matter What the Price. 

Andre (Sh Andre 



The 
Gift 
Store 



The 

Gift 
Store 



DRUGS 



BOOKS 



City Drug and Book 

Store 

J. A. OBERMEYER & SON 

S. Side Square 

Give Us a Call 
Bell 457 III inois 572 

College Suplies Pennants 



ALDEN BROWN 



314 W. STATE ST. 



Pictures 
Frames 



Artist 
Materials 



HAIRDRESSER. 

Artistic hairdressing, Shampooing, Manicuring, Facial 
Massage. Treatment of the Hair and Scalp, my specialty 

Will call by appointment. 
MRS. JOHN R. DUNN Residence 640 S. Prairie St. 

Illinois Phone 1194. 



All the faculty, students and friends 
of the College should have a checking 
or savings acount with 

F. G. Farrell & Co. 

BANKERS 

F. E. Farrell ...President 

E. E. Crabtree V. President 

H. H. Potter Cashier 

M. W. Osborne Ass't Cash. 



^_ 



Pacific Motel 

Jacksonville, 111. 
Jacksonville's Best Hotel 



70 ROOMS 



S. M. CAMPBELL, Manager 



COLLEGE GIRLS: 

See our Motor Coats, Mackinaws and Sweaters 
Manito Hosiery. Also Ladies' Holeproof Hosiery 

LUKEMAN BROS. 



GIRLS, PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 



Cf)e &per$ jBtattonal Jlanfe 



Established 1852 



CAPITAL 

$200,000 

SURPLUS 

$50,000 

DEPOSITS 

$2,000,000 




UNITED STATES 
DEPOSITORY 

POSTAL SAVINGS 
DEPOSITORY 

MEMBER OF 

FEDERAL 

RESERVE BANK 



LADIES' DEPARTMENT 
We have provided a Special Department for Ladies with a window 
for their exclusive use in transacting their business, also a Ladies 9 writ- 
ing room adjoinng, daintily furnished, which is at their disposal. 

OFFICERS 

M. F. Dunlap President O. F. Buffe Cashier 

Andrew Russel V. President H. C. Clement Asst. Cashier 
Chas. B. Graff V. President W. G. Goebel Asst. Cashier 
H. J. Rodgers V. President H. K. Chenowith Ast. Cashier 
Arthur Vannier Ast. Cashier 



DIRECTORS 



Owen P. Thompson 
B. F. Goltra 
John W. Leach 
Andrew Russel 



George Dietrick 
H. M. Capps 
0. F. Buffe 
M. F. Dunlap 




COLLEGEJWWEAR 

Large assortment of Foot- 
wear for every occasion. 

Dress, Street and Bed-Room 
Footwear. 

HOPPERS 

WE REPAIR SHOES 



MATH1S, KAMM & SHIBE 

SAY 

This is just to remind you that 
we can suply any and all of 
your FOOTWEAR needs. 



CITY STEAM 

Cleaning and Dyeing Works 

208 E. State 

E. A. SCHOEDSACEK, Proprietor 



Party Dresses, Kid Gloves 

Sliippers a Specialty 



'Tis not what we give, but what we share, 
For the gift without the giver is bare. 

— Vision of Sir Launfal. 



STYLE + QUALITY + FINE SHOE MAKING 



THE GYPSY BOOT 
WILL BE THE 
LEADING STYLE 
THIS FALL 




WE HAVE THEM 

IN 

BRONZE KID 

BLUE KID 

NAT KID 



*>shoe.co: 



Complete Line of Evening Slippers 

J AS. McGINNIS & CO. 



Society Programs and Menus 
THE ROACH PRESS 

ILLINOIS PHONE 236 OPPOSITE POST OFFICE 

Our Customers Say: "The Service is a little better." 



LENG. MAGILL 

FOR PRINTING 

PROGRAMS, INVITATIONS 
PERSONAL CARDS, ETC. 

No. 227 EAST STATE STREET 
Illinois Phone 418 

Our Motto: "Not how cheap, but how 
good." 



JOB PRINTING OF ALL KINDS 

JOHN K. LONG 

Engraved Cards and Invitations 
Programs and Stationery 

213 WEST MORGAN STREET 

ILLINOIS PHONE 400 



A face wreathed in smiles is better that a mansion 
wreathed in holly. 



T5\)t <&rapl)ic ^Vrts 
Concern 



PRINTERS 
PUBLISHERS 
STATIONERS 
Engraved Cards 
Artistic Programs 
for Special Occasions 



I.M.BUNCE&CO 



PRINTING 



OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 



Plain China for Decorating 



Dr. ALBYN LINCOLN ADAMS 

OCULIST AND AURIST 

To the State School for the Blind 

323 WEST STATE STREET 



Practice Limited to Diseases of the 
EYE, EAR, NOSE & THROAT 
Both Telephones 



GEORGE STACY, M. D. 

(Northwestern University) 
S. E. Cor. Square (over Hoppers') 



Sees patients by appointment, at of- 
fice and elsewhere. Office hours: 11 to 
1; 2 to 4. Telephones: Bell 435, 111. 
1335 and (home) 1334. 



ALPHA B. APPLEBEE 

DENTIST 
326 WEST STATE STREET 



Dr. AUSTIN C. KINQSLEY 

DENTIST 

409 AYERS BANK BUILDING 

Both Phones 760 



As for you, a Merry Christmas ! As for all of us, 
"God bless us, every one." 



S.S.KRESGECO. 

5 and 10c STORE 



A POPULAR PLACE for COLLEGE 
GIRLS 



fflte&naoiaim, 



212-214 £. State St 



Cloaks. Suits, Furs 
and Millinery 

At Prices TKat Are Rigkt 







Music Hall 
Erected 1906 



Main Building 
Erected 1850 



Extension 
Erected 1902 



Harker Hall 
Erected 1909 



ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE 



College of Liberal Arts 
College of Music 
School of Fine Arts 
School of Expression 
School of Home Economics 
A Standard College 

Regular college and academy courses leading to 
Bachelor's degree. Pre-eminently a Christian 
college with every facility for thorough work. 
Located in the Middle West, in a beautiful, dig- 
nified, old college town, noted for its literary 
and music atmosphere. 

Let us have names of your friends who are 
looking for a good college. 

Call or address, Registrar, 

ILLINOIS WOMAN'S COLLEGE 

Jacksonville, Illinois 




0112105817651